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This tag is associated with 7 posts

Education: Are we counting what counts?

Yong ZhaoYong Zhao spoke to a packed house full of educators (in the holidays, no less) about how the purpose of education has changed and what educators have to do prepare students for the future.

Zhao asked some challenging questions, inviting us to think why we do what we do and how it might be different. He questioned the growth in testing and measuring learning, asking why it happens and what value it has.

Some of the thought-provoking things that Zhao asked us to consider included:

  • What must we teach and what is optional?
    • Why?
  • What is success?
    • Failure?
  • Is the focus on a ‘growth mindset’ a good thing?
    • What are the alternatives?
  • What do we need to do to equip students to meet future employment needs?
    • Is it the same for everyone?
  • If someone is missing skills in ‘the basics’, at what cost do we ‘fill the gap’?
    • What could we do instead?
Giving us much to think about, the talk is an excellent prompt for further discussion, perhaps at staff meetings, or even in class.
Zhao isn’t just knowledgeable and informative – he’s very entertaining, too. He’s a great speaker and a would-be stand-up comedian, which makes this an enjoyable talk.
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It’s definitely worth any educator’s time to watch.
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About Yong Zhao: Zhao is an expert on educational models, and has published 30 books and over 100 articles on education. His full bio is here. You can read more about his thinking here.

This talk was part of a Wellington forum that took place on 20th July 2016, sponsored by NZEI Te Riu Roa.

An NZ teacher asks, why am I so racist

Jamie Banks is half white. Or is he? What does it even mean?

Here, in a fabulously funny and thought-provoking speech, and through a reflection on his own personal journey, Jamie reflects on what it means to be white, half white, not white, and how our view of ourselves influences how we view others.

“…although I had been a victim of racism, I was racist myself”

Truly worth watching and thinking about.

 

If you want to speak to Jamie about his speech or teaching, he can be reached here.

Ka pai, Jamie – love your work.

~ Dianne

Jamie Banks is an author, actor, rapper, performance poet and teacher, who has been campaigning since 2008 to get Emotional Intelligence (and now also Financial and Business Literacy) formally introduced into the curriculum.

Professional page: https://www.facebook.com/Banksta.Rapper/?fref=ts

Emotional Intelligence in NZ Schools: https://www.facebook.com/Emotional-Intelligence-in-NZ-Schools-467013176736336/?fref=ts

Business Literacy in Schools: https://www.facebook.com/Business.Literacy.in.NZ.Schools/?fref=ts

Education sector reactions to Key’s announcement

questionThis clip from 3 news sums up well the positives and the concerns with today’s announcement from John Key regarding new money for some in education. It’s worth watching – only 2-3 minutes, but a good summary.

The concerns and questions voiced most often by educators at the conference and on social media so far have been:

  • no acknowledgement of role of poverty in under achievement, and nothing to address that issue
  • incentivising some educators and not others leads to less collaboration and more ‘gaming the system’ – a divisive move
  • many noted that good and experienced teachers more often leave because teaching is no longer joyful, not because they want more money
  • worries about the Change Principals – who will appoint them, what happens to the incumbent principal (sacked?), and who decides what constitutes a failing school?  (Already today I have heard 2 radio commentators talking about these principals going in to ‘rescue low decile schools’ – as if decile is a clear indicator of success or failure.)
  • Many are confused as to why the Ministry fought NZEI so hard against specialist lead teachers in the collective bargaining negotiations, and yet today more and higher paid lead teachers were announced today – why the sudden change of stance on that?  What’s going on?
  • No extra money for schools – all for individuals
  • Nothing for special needs students or special needs professional development.

I will give the last word to a teacher :

“:…give the money to schools rather than individuals! Aren’t there enough programmes and p.d in place..we already have senior teachers / units for lead teachers etc…what we dont have is enough money to do the best we can in a day to day running of a classroom…resources…assessment time….how about spending that money $360M on fixing/removing nat standards?? Ohhh maybe even take a good look at nomore woops novopay? Just a thought….”

What are your thoughts?  Are there any other questions or observations you would like to add?

~ Dianne

Other reading:

England’s “Superheads”

 

Why I love teaching

Sure, the politics drive me batty, so why do I carry on teaching?

I could tell you so many stories of special, amazing, beautiful children I have taught and what they have taught me.

But this video sums it up better than anything I could write.  

Make sure you watch until the end, not just for the boy’s achievement, but for the reactions of the staff and his peers.

Beautiful.

Well done, Mushy.

Teachers – thank you, thank you, thank you – John Kuhn’s speech

John Kuhn’s Rally Speech
By John Kuhn – Supt
Feb 27, 2013, 08:39

Are there any teachers in this crowd?

I want to say something to teachers that our lawmakers should have said long ago:  Thank You!   Thank you for keeping our children safe.  Thank you for drying their tears when they scrape their knees, for cheering on our junior high basketball players, for going up to your room on Sundays to get ready to teach my kids on Monday.  Gracias por cuidarlos!  As a dad, I thank you.

Coaches, thank you for fixing little girls’ softball swings and for showing our boys how to tie their ties.  Thank you for getting our children safely home on the yellow dog after late ballgames, marching contests, and one-act plays.

Thank you for buying all those raffle tickets, hams, pies, discount cards, Girl Scout cookies, insulated mugs and pumpkin rolls, for buying more playoff shirts than any one person could possibly need and on top of all that spending your own money on pencils and prizes and supplies for your classroom.

There are those poor deluded souls who say you take more than you give, and I disagree with them with everything I am.  Don’t let them get you down.  They wouldn’t last a day in your classroom.

You are NOT a drain on this economy; you are a bubbling spring of tomorrow’s prosperity. You’re a fountain of opportunity for other people’s children.

As educational attainment goes up, crime, teen pregnancy, unemployment, and prison rates all go down.  Squalor and ignorance retreat. Social wounds begin to heal.  Our state progresses; our tomorrow brightens.

What you do, teacher, is priceless.  You don’t create jobs.  You create job creators.

Read the rest here:  http://dianeravitch.net/2013/02/27/what-supt-john-kuhn-said-at-texas-rally/

or here http://www.texasisd.com/article_135671.shtml

David Shearer’s Labour Party Conference Speech – The Education Bits

David Shearer, Labour Leader

What is Labour promising to do for education if elected in 2014…

The approach to education will change.

I started my working life as a teacher. So I have an appreciation of the valuable job teachers do.

And I know a gimmick when I see one.

Bigger classes, unqualified teachers, charter schools and performance pay will achieve nothing.

The intelligent approach, the one I will follow is the one that asks:  what will it take to make this education system the best in the world?

Our teachers are demoralised. Yet we all know they are critical to equipping our kids for the modern world.

We know too that shutting schools in Christchurch destroys communities and causes heartache for already distressed families.

I went to a public meeting there after receiving a moving letter from Christchurch mum Sonya Boyd.  She’s devastated that her local school will close and is worried about the impact on her son Ben, his friends and in fact the whole community.

At that meeting a parent told me: Hekia Parata is doing what 10,000 earthquakes couldn’t do – destroying our school.

I say to the people of Christchurch: we are committed to helping you rebuild your city from the grassroots up – not the Beehive down.

You want, more than anything, to get your lives back, and on your own terms.

It’s time you had a government that stood alongside you.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Closing Statement

“We won’t be taking office to tinker, we’ll be taking office to remake New Zealand.

So I am asking you.

To rise up.

To take a message of hope to New Zealanders.

To fight for our future.

To say loud and clear that there is a better way. There is a Labour way.

We can do it, standing strong together.

We can make the change.

And we’ll do that in 2014.”

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For the whole speech, click here.

Catherine Delahunty’s Speech to Parliament on Education 14/8/12

CATHERINE DELAHUNTY (Green):

I am delighted to take a call on this issue because the estimates debate is very is important on education and the last year of spending on education reflects some of the most contradictory policy and priority setting that I have seen since I have been a parliamentarian.

It starts right at the top, for example, when the Prime Minister came out and said that he would not be too worried if his children were taught by unqualified teachers. That is right from the very top — a message that is completely at odds with what the Minister of Education has been saying about the importance of professionalism and qualifications, and, in fact, reviewing the Teachers Council registration policy. So what is it that the Government is saying?

Sure, at King’s College where the Prime Minister’s son has been, there is a snowball in hell scenario that they are going to hire unregistered or untrained teachers. It is simply not going to happen. They are going to have small classes and highly qualified staff. Meanwhile we have the Minister constantly arguing for teachers to improve their qualifications and professionalism. So which one is it: untrained and unaccountable, and publicly funded for-profit charter schools, or professionalism; national standards for students aged 6 years old, but none-standards for teachers and selected experimental not-for-profit situations.

Quite frankly, that, along with class sizes and charter schools, is an unmitigated disaster.

Let us talk about charter schools just for a minute, because they are addressed in the estimates. The Government put aside $230,000 for the charter school working party headed by Catherine Isaac — clearly not exactly a neutral figure in the eyes of anyone who has anything to do with education or politics. And what that working party has said is that they will develop options for schools where there will be public money put in, but people like those in Destiny can apply. All kinds of people can apply, they can be as fundamentalist, as ideologically driven as they like, and they will not necessarily have to meet the same standards that are expected in public schools, which, when you think it is public money, is pretty appalling.

The Green Party is not arguing that there should not be choice in education. If people want their children to be taught by fundamentalists of any stripe, or encouraged to believe that homosexuality is a sin, or that climate change is a myth, or that evolution is anti-Christian, for example, then do that, but pay for the privilege. Do not ask us to pay as a country for that privilege. That is what the private education system offers. We are talking about public money going into a weird experiment that has failed all over the world.

So we are very concerned that this Budget reinforces that idea. We are also appalled by the contradictions between statements the Prime Minister has made and the statements the Minister has made on this issue. Let us then move to the other disaster area in education: the class size one, as my colleague Nanaia Mahuta has touched on, was a back-down that reflected a long planned, but badly planned, vision that nobody except Treasury could give any credence to. It just shows you what happens when people do not have a vision in education: it is not about anything except money. Treasury wrote the book and said: “Let’s have a plan to actually make this affordable. Let’s cut back on education. Let’s pretend it’s an investment.” But Treasury could not convince the rest of the country.

It had the Government on its side but nobody else — nobody else. So we saw fantastic unity across a sector that is not always unified and does not always speak with one voice, and the Government was forced to do a back-down. Well, that is an indication not that it had learnt, and not that it believed that the parents were right, but that it had realised it could not sell the policy. This was a cynical and depressing scenario, because we asked the Minister of Education whether she had changed her view after hearing from parents, and she said she had not. She still thought it was a great idea, and it is very, very sad for the parents and children of New Zealand that that was the agenda.

Some information on national standards was put on the website last week, and, again, it is a real mess. It is a real cut-and-paste job. You cannot understand what you are reading, you do not know what it is that you are going to get — sorry, not you, Mr Chair — what the parents will get, and it does not make any sense. The moderation tool that is being developed at great expense — about $5 million has been spent so far on developing the work around national standards, but it is not finished — will not be ready until 2014.

So what are people going to make of that? The Government put up a policy that had no tool for creating any kind of moderation, and although it will not be on offer until 2014, somehow the parents are going to get the benefit of reading the data that are completely different from school to school. That is somehow supposed to be softening the parents up for the standards. Even if you believed that was a good idea, it is a bad way to have gone about it. The Green Party does not think that league tables are a good idea. We think that league tables are for sports teams. League tables are great in the Olympics, but they are not for children. Labels are useful on jam jars, but not on children.

Our fundamental problem with national standards is not the way that they are being delivered but the idea that a narrow mechanism that reduces the New Zealand curriculum — which is upheld around the world as a valuable and broad curriculum — to a narrow set of literacy and numeracy standards is narrowing teachers’ requirements to teach-to-test. No matter what the Government says, there is huge anxiety out there. It would be interesting if people listened to the evidence of people like Professor Martin Thrupp, who went to England and looked at the model over there. Some countries have gone around the track, and they have followed the track of increasingly narrowing and teaching-to-test—Britain is one of them—and others, for example, Finland and some of the Asian countries, have gone the opposite way and have invested in a broad curriculum. The results are very clear.

Britain and the United States are failing the children who are already struggling because of poverty and social context. Initiatives like national standards only create anxiety, and they are driving teachers out of the profession — because people become teachers from the sense of moral mission to give an input into children’s lives. Children need the best people in this country, but the best people will be driven out if we narrow what has been established as being an excellent curriculum and turn it into a bunch of mechanisms. It is lovely to read numbers; they make life really simple, but guess what? Numbers do not reflect the reality of what the complex matter of each child’s individual learning is actually about. I wonder whether the Government actually looks at what learning means instead of what numbers mean when it set up these standards, because the standards are absolutely incapable of delivering rich and contextual — which is what the Minister calls it — information for parents.

It is a sad sight when you see this being justified on a daily basis in this House. It is not what people voted for at all. They voted for the idea of our kids all doing well. What they got was this mechanistic, failed system, which is incoherent and has not even been properly moderated. Quite frankly, that, along with class sizes and charter schools, is an unmitigated disaster. What is also a disaster is the lack of coherence in the Government’s way of relating to the sector. You cannot improve children’s learning unless you have good relationships not only with child and teacher but also with teachers and politicians. I am not saying the teachers always get it right, but what I am saying is that declaring war on the education sector, the academics, and the professionals is not the way in which you make change happen. We all agree that there are kids who need more support in school. And some of us know that is because the goal of the school system should be equity.

The Finns are at the top of the Programme for International Student Assessment table, because the goal of their education system is not achievement; it is equity. Equity comes first, then participation, and then achievement. But why listen to the experts? After all, the Finns have many good models, which we would do better to look at than looking at Britain and the United States, where we have these bizarre failures. Look at New Orleans. Hurricane Katrina has turned into an educational disaster. What happened is that public schooling has collapsed. Because of the disaster they have brought in these experimental charter schools — these for-profits — and as a result you have children falling through the cracks in greater numbers than ever before. That is a tragedy.

We must make sure that we do not let what has been a good education system become a game for Treasury, an experiment for the Government, and a sacrifice of the good things, under the fake mythology that what we need is running schools like a business. What we need is to run education for liberation, for life, and for life-long learning. It is not a mechanistic business. It is a mission. We should take on the Finns’ ideal, which is that not everybody can be a teacher. They invest a huge amount in teacher training. They say that if you want to lift the quality of the education system, you must lift the quality of the people who are allowed to be teachers. So instead of saying the most fabulous job you can have is to be a corporate financial speculator, or some kind of merchant banker, or that being a lawyer or even an MP is the best job in the world — the best job in the world needs to be a teacher.

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