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Political heavyweights go head to head on children’s issues

Key political figures will debate the rights and interests of children at a forum to be held at Ponsonby Primary in Auckland next week.

The event promises to be a lively one with Education Minister Hekia Parata facing off against a full complement of party spokespeople and candidates.

Those taking part alongside Hekia Parata include:

  • Jacinda Ardern (Labour)
  • Denise Roche (Greens)
  • Miriam Pierard (Internet Mana)
  • Tracey Martin (New Zealand First Deputy)
  • John Thompson (ACT President)

The event is being run under the banner of ‘Tick for Kids’; a collective that seeks to put the interests of children at the centre.

Spokesperson Anton Blank says, “We want New Zealanders to engage with politicians about issues for our children. These local events provide platforms for everyone to articulate these concerns to political candidates directly.”

With so many important politicians involved the debate is bound to be vigorous and wide-ranging, covering education, health, housing and child poverty.

“We know that the New Zealand public is concerned about increasing rates of child poverty,” says Anton Blank.

He states that the ‘Tick for Kids’ movement, which is less than a year old, is becoming an important non-partisan force in New Zealand and the engagement of politicians in ‘Tick for Kids’ events is proof of that.

When: Wednesday August 6th

Where: Ponsonby Primary School, 44 Curran Street, Herne Bay, Auckland

See event information.

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For more information:

http://tick4kids.org.nz/

https://www.facebook.com/tickforkids

 

Teacher stress, depression and suicide

stress

It concerns me that so many teachers now talk of stress, depression, and  the need to get out of the profession for their health.   It is not light-hearted when teachers talk of being unhappy then add in “… thank goodness for the kids.”  Sometimes the children are all that are keeping a teacher going.

 

But why are teachers so stressed?

Often the stress is blamed on the constant changes, not because of the changes themselves but because there is little faith the changes are well thought out or improve student achievement and so it feels like a lot of extra work for no good reason, often at the expense of time to do other work that the teacher feels is more valuable.

People will tolerate a lot when they can see value in it – conversely, they are weighed down by what feels valueless.

There is also a feeling that teachers have no say in the direction that education is taking, and little to no control of their own profession. When I asked a group of teachers whether they would send in submissions against the Education Amendment Bill (2), they asked what’s the point, citing that thousands of submissions against charter schools were simply ignored.

Teachers feel helpless – done to rather than part of.

 

To what degree is teacher health suffering?

Well that’s just it – I’m not sure that anyone is researching this.  If there are any studies under way looking at stress and depression in relation to New Zealand teachers, please do let me know.  You might wonder why we need to research the problem?  And what we might want to ask?

What I think we need to ask is this:

– are teachers happy in their jobs?

– do teachers feel supported and well looked after?

– are they considering leaving the profession due to stress/ill health?

– has the rate and direction of education reforms in NZ over the past few years had an impact on teacher health?

– Do you feel there is more of a problem now than five or ten years ago?

Something that concerns me very much is that in the UK that teacher suicide rates are now around 40% higher than for ‘all occupations’.  Is it the same here in Aotearoa?   Despite being a very difficult subject, it is something we have to confront.  NZ already has a serious problem with high depression and suicide rates, and no-one wants to see that get worse.

Another thing to be aware of is that there is anecdotal evidence that when a teacher in England is looking for critical illness insurance cover it is only available if mental conditions and stress-related illness are excluded.  Do teachers in NZ have similar problems?  I know of at least one teacher who is no longer covered for mental health since having time off due to stress – is that widespread?

It really is something we need to keep an eye on.  The last thing we need is a depressed profession – just imagine the impact that would have on individual lives and on the quality of education.  It would be a lose/lose situation that no-one would want to see happen

[Edit 15/4/16] SOSNZ have set up a small survey regarding NZ teachers’ emotional wellbeing and would welcome your input. The article and survey can be found here.

Getting Help

If you feel stressed, do not leave it until it gets worse.  If you are on edge, not sleeping, feeling edgy or tearful, dreading work, and so on, then you owe it to yourself to get support and help immediately.  Please do not feel you have to plod on alone – you don’t. Talk to people close to you, if you can, discuss the problems with a supportive manager, speak with your doctor, and make use of support services that are available (below).

If you recognise someone is stressed, please reach out to them and offer support and help.  They may just need an ear.  You could point them to the help listed below.  Either way, they will welcome your kind support and it makes all the difference to know that people understand and care.

Employee Assistance Program (EAP):

Free counselling is available for most NZ teachers. The program gives staff access to three sessions of free confidential counselling and advice each year that is either face-to-face, via telephone, or online chat.  EAP registered practitioners can help with  relationship breakdowns, alcohol and drug issues, workplace bullying, family issues, depression, financial stress and personal trauma.  Check whether your school is subscribed to the EAP as part of their Health and Safety strategy.  You can book online.

Other help:

Below is a list of other New Zealand services that offer support, information and help. All services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week unless otherwise specified.

  • Lifeline – 0800 543 354 or (09) 5222 999 within Auckland
  • Depression Helpline – 0800 111 757
  • Healthline – 0800 611 116
  • Samaritans – 0800 726 666 (for callers from the Lower North Island, Christchurch and West Coast) or 0800 211 211 / (04) 473 9739 (for callers from all other regions)
  • Suicide Crisis Helpline (aimed at those in distress, or those who are concerned about the wellbeing of someone else) – 0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOKO)
  • What’s Up (for 5-18 year olds; 1 pm to 11 pm) – 0800 942 8787
  • Child Helpline – (for 5-18 year olds; 9am – 7pm daily) – 0800 366 694 or email help@childhelpline.org.nz
  • www.depression.org.nz – includes The Journal online help service
  • www.thelowdown.co.nz – visit the website, email team@thelowdown.co.nz or free text 5626 (emails and text messages will be responded to between 12 noon and 12 midnight).
  • OUTLine NZ – 0800 688 5463 (OUTLINE) (provides confidential telephone support for sexuality or gender identity issues).

If you’re outside of New Zealand, you can find help near you through this international list of crisis centres.

Lastly, please look after yourself and others.  It’s not the easiest time to be teaching, but you owe it to yourself to stay well.

Sources and further reading

PPTA Bulletin – Stress at work

EAP Services

The Mental Health Foundation 

 

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