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What should a primary school student report look like?

Hekia Parata said today that parents LOVE National Standards.  This is clearly not true, given the huge number of people speaking up against them.

But here’s what I want to know:

– what DO parents want to see on school reports?

– what does a comprehensive and informative school report look like?

– have you seen one that you thought was a good example that others might like to consider using?

 

A MISSION FOR YOU

reportcardI want to collect a bank of GOOD report layouts that inform about the whole child and their understanding of the wide, rich curriculum.

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to send me in photos of school  report layouts you like.

You can blank out or cover child’s names and the school name or I can do that for you.

Please email them to:  sosnzmail@gmail.com

 

MY MISSION

I will ensure the photos are edited for privacy and then share them on here, so people can discuss what they do/do not want to see on a child’s report card.

Now go get your reports, photograph them and send them to me with comments!

 

Thank you,Dianne

National Standards will make their (skid) mark…

A warning about National Standards data – reblogged from The Daily Blog

“There is a unanimous expert opinion

– even among those championing the potential of the National Standards –

that it would be very foolish indeed to make judgments about any school

on the basis of their results.”  (Source)

Soon we will be treated to another battery of shonky data from The Ministry of Education.

John Key trumpets that “National Standards in education are a critical part of the National-led plan for securing a brighter future for New Zealand children”.   Just how, Mr Key?  Tell us how crappy data, poorly reported, helps us towards a brighter future.

Because it doesn’t give us a whole lot of faith when some assessment tools are widely reported to give inflated results and one this week announced that “new mapping has been applied to existing test results… you will notice that the curriculum levels have moved down – usually by one or two curriculum sub-levels. ”  What?

So let me get this right…  Teachers are spending hours and hours assessing kids’ work using tools approved by the Ministry.  The Ministry then decides the tools are not accurate or reliable. The end grades are then moved up and down by the Ministry (seemingly more often than whore’s drawers, and possibly with less shame).   And then the results are published as if they mean something useful…

Give me a break…

by Dianne Khan, reblogged from The Daily Blog

Read the rest here: A warning about National Standards data – reblogged from The Daily Blog

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