archives

Teach First NZ

This category contains 10 posts

NZ First Introduces Bill to Protect the Title of “Teacher”

Tracey Martin NZ FirstTracey Martin MP, Spokesperson for Education – Press Release

New Zealand First wants to protect the title of “teacher” and we will introduce a member’s bill to do so this week.

“The National Government, with support of the ACT Party and Maori Party, continue to amend the Education Act to allow individuals without in depth teacher training to market themselves as ‘teachers’ to parents and students.

“This is an attack on the status of our teachers and is likely to lower the standard of teaching and learning in schools.

“Parents should be 100% confident that anyone using the title of teacher has successfully completed the appropriate qualifications to support their students learning.

“This government has allowed Charter Schools to put untrained and unqualified individuals into classrooms and call themselves teachers. The new Education Amendment Bill will allow well-meaning degree graduates to market themselves as teachers, without in class supervision, after only an eight week Christmas course.

“Under the New Zealand First bill all parents can be assured that if their child has a ‘teacher’ then they are being taught by an educational specialist. By providing this simple method of identification parents truly have choice when it comes to who is leading the learning in their child’s education,” says Mrs Martin.

~ ENDS

The true costs of teacher training

This UK report looks at the true cost of teacher training, taking into account the costs to government and the retention rate of the teacher trainees to work out the true cost per teacher who is still teaching after 5 years.

Key findings:

  • There is a need for local demand for teachers to be taken into account in teacher trainee allocations.
  • Retention is affected by the relative pay of teachers and other local workers, so national pay restraint for teachers has the potential to reduce retention.
  • Teach First recruits work out very costly compared to other routes into teaching.
  • Teach First teachers have a far higher drop out rate than teachers trained by other routes, with 60% not teaching after 5 years compared with 40% of those trained by other routes.
  • There is little evidence that paying bursaries to teachers in shortage subjects helps attract and retain them.

Since New Zealand also has issues with teacher recruitment and retention, with shortages on some areas and a glut of teachers in others, and since we too have Teach First as a route into teaching, it would be interesting to know how this compares to New Zealand.

~ Dianne

Image courtesy of sattva at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

 

More untrained teachers in the classroom

Last week, out of nowhere, government added a proposal to the Education Act update that would allow Teach First teacher trainees to be in the classroom unsupervised.

Yes, that’s right – a trainee with no qualifications in teaching would be allowed to be in charge of the whole class unsupervised.

You have to wonder why that would be proposed? What’s the justification?

Fishy goings on?

Before getting to the education issues, I first have to ask, how is it acceptable to add in such an important change to the proposed Education Act amendments without informing people so we have a chance to submit? That’s not democracy; it’s underhand, disingenuous and it’s railroading.

You have  to wonder what the process was that led to it being put in at the very last minute, too. The cynic in me can’t help but wonder whether it was purposefully held back just long enough to leave no time for people to put up submissions about the plan. If that’s not the reason, then why the last-minute appearance? Something’s fishy, and this time it’s not MPI’s catch quotas.

Lowering the bar

As with any proposals, we should ask who this proposal benefits and who it impacts.

We have a glut of well-trained, qualified primary trained teachers as it is, so where’s the need to lower the bar this way? What’s the imperative to have trainees in front of classrooms with no supervision?

Better Training?

I’d love to hear how unsupervised time in the classroom is better for the trainee than supervised training and co-teaching, where a teacher with years of experience observes and gives feedback and where the student can see the teacher at work and reflect on what works well and why.

Good self reflection on one’s pedagogical practice is something that develops over time, guided initially by mentors and becoming deeper and more meaningful as you grow as a teacher. It’s not something you can just do. After all, to begin with, you don’t know what you don’t know.

So how is being unsupervised/unmentored /unsupported a good move?

Better Trainees?

Teach First often cites that its trainee teachers have high degrees or Masters qualifications. But being a good teacher isn’t just about knowing your subject, and even more so at primary level where your subject will be only a tiny part of what you teach anyway.

Just as important as book smarts is knowing how to engage students, how to create a productive environment, how to plan effectively, how to adapt planning on the fly when you have to, how to deal with upsets, what to do to support those who struggle or who find a task easy, how to spot those who are not pushing themselves and what to do to help them, how to deal with parents’ concerns, what to do about the wriggler or the weeper or the kind that has a tendency to disrupt things. How to teach kids to analyse their own work and improve it, what to do about the kids who never push themselves and the ones who are too hard on themselves. How to help the kid that has started stealing things. How to stay calm and deal with  vomit, wees and a’code brown’so that the child involved isn’t stigmatised. What to do when a lunch box is empty or insufficient. Or when a child is taking other kids’ food. How to stick to timings, how to teach students to care for their environment and pack up the classroom equipment properly and efficiently. How to encourage and support reluctant readers. And what to do when the fire alarm goes or when a kid suddenly runs out of your classroom and keeps running.

While you’re learning those things, you need a mentor on hand.

Guinea pigs

Most pertinently, it is important to ask how this impact students.

ID-10031820

Image courtesy of joannawnuk at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Government keeps telling us that to give students the best change of success teachers must be excellently trained. How is this excellence?

I’ve seen some good and great initial teacher trainees but also some absolute shockers, including ones with lots of classroom experience, so it concerns me that this proposal allows not just seasoned trainees but also brand new trainees to go into classrooms unsupervised. How someone with no teaching experience or training (practical or theoretical) can be expected to do a good job of teaching without guidance is mind-boggling.

As a teacher it concerns me: As a parent I am fuming.

My child is not a guinea pig. My child deserves a qualified teacher. And so does yours.

Reformers’ teacher training schemes – what’s the problem?

wanted teachersFor those of you that think how New Zealand structures teacher training in future isn’t an issue to be concerned about, take time to read this and see how, in the UK, outstanding university courses in Teacher training have been shut down since their equivalent scheme, School Direct, started.

The Department for Education boasts that take up for the scheme is great:

…there will be 17,609 places for School Direct trainees in 2015 and 15,490 higher education postgraduate places

Proponents cite the increasing numbers of applications year on year as evidence that School Direct works. I would posit that it is evidence that would-be teachers can no longer afford to go to university and prefer to earn money while training.  Who wouldn’t?  But that in no way means the scheme is superior in terms of training.

There are another concern, too.

As universities shut down their teacher training programmes, there will eventually be a lack of places even for School Direct trainees to get their uni-based components:

Under School Direct, schools recruit trainees directly and link up with universities to provide out-of-classroom training. Trainees have an “expectation of employment” at their school at the end of their training.

But critics are concerned that the shift to School Direct may destabilise the teacher training system because universities cannot guarantee student numbers – and so funding – year on year.

And there’s a teacher shortage looming in the UK…

Hey, but who cares, because when push comes to shove the government will scream !!!TEACHER SHORTAGE!!! and decree that teachers don’t have to be trained at all.

You know, like they don’t in charter schools already….

See the link?

Cheap, disposable labour – seemingly the government’s goal for all employees these days.

I think the most telling part of the article is when the Department for Education spokesperson said:

“The School Direct programme is a key part of our plan for education.”

Yes. I bet it is.

Alllllll part of the bigger plan.

I’m telling you, people, we are on one hell of a slippery slope.

~ Dianne

______________________________________________________

Sources and further reading:

http://news.tes.co.uk/b/news/2014/10/15/more-school-direct-places-than-university-pgces-in-2015.aspx

http://www.newstatesman.com/education/2013/08/why-isnt-government%E2%80%99s-school-direct-scheme-attracting-enough-schools

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2013/jul/08/teacher-training-in-schools

http://dianeravitch.net/category/teach-for-america-tfa/

 

Resist Teach For America (and Teach First NZ?)

resist TFAThe article below highlights concerns with Teach For America (TFA) and speaks to many of the concerns regarding Teach First NZ:

Article Reblogged from Cloaking Inequity:

“Have you ever found yourself trapped in the insufferable position of having to tolerate a Teach For America true believer relentlessly bombarding you with justifications for Teach For America’s placement atop the corporate org chart of educational excellence?

Teach For America is a $300 million “non-profit” organization that executes a highly sophisticated integrated marketing communications strategy that includes traditional and digital advertising, a wide range of experiential and special event initiatives, and plenty of public and media relations.

With millions spent on corporate communications, it’s to be expected that Teach For America has crafted a concise list of focus-group tested talking points. With discipline matched only by GOP pundits, Teach For America’s “brand evangelists” (from the corporate communications team all the way down to the on-campus recruitment interns) stay “on message” by relentlessly repeating the same lines. The only problem? Many are deceptive at best, while others are downright false.

Here are some suggested replies for eight of Teach For America’s most tried arguments.

1. When a Teach For America supporter says: ”Teach For America might not be the answer, but it’s a part of the solution.”

This is how you might respond: To overcome the challenges associated with educational inequity, Teach For America’s standard of training would require it to be vastly superior to any school of education or alternative route – not less. Corps members would need the ability to deconstruct their own privilege, fully understand their own role in historically oppressed communities, and develop strong relationships with true veteran teachers (not Teach For America corps members who only taught 2 or 3 years). Unfortunately, with only a few weeks of training, and often zero student-teaching hours within the placement community or assigned grade, Teach For America corps members receive nothing close to the unparalleled training that would be required to systemically reduce educational inequity. In all likelihood, by providing the least prepared teachers to the students with the greatest needs, Teach For America corps members may be doing more harm than good.

2. When a Teach For America supporter says: “Teach For America corps members are more effective teachers. The Mathematica study shows that Teach For America corps members produce gains equal to 2.6 extra months of learning.”

This is how you might respond: This is how you might respond: First, there is no such thing as a test that measures months of learning. That would mean all students learn at the same pace. As any parent or teacher knows, that’s not true. In fact, the “gain” was just .07 standard deviations (miniscule in statistics). By comparison, reducing class size can increase learning by .20 standard deviations (3x more effective). Second, the study only included Teach For America secondary math teachers (136 of them), but claims that this is true for all Teach For America corps members regardless of whether they teach secondary math or not. In most communities, the majority of Teach For America corps members teach elementary, not secondary. Therefore, the miniscule test score gains in this study do not apply to the vast majority of Teach For America corps members. Using the Mathematica study to imply that all Teach For America corps members are more effective than other teachers is patently deceptive. (This entry was edited on 3/19/2014 to make a correction in response to a critiqued levied by Teach For America)

For more information on the Mathematica study check out:

How I teach 2.6 months more of math in a year than the rest of you slackers
New Mathematica TFA Study is Irrational Exuberance
“Does Not Compute”: Teach For America Mathematica Study is Deceptive?

resist TFA 23. When a Teach For America supporter says:  “Teach For America doesn’t take jobs from other teachers. Teach For America just provides corps members for regions that have teacher shortages.”

This is how you might respond: School districts run by politicians who are pushing for the corporate takeover of public education sign contracts with Teach For America to hire Teach For America corps members each year regardless of whether there is a qualified teacher shortage in the region or not. Chicago is a perfect example. In 2013, after closing 49 schools and laying off 850 teachers and staff because of “budget concerns”, Mayor Rahm Emmanuel’s hand-picked school board authorized an increase of 325 new Teach For America corps members at a cost to Chicago taxpayers of $1.6 million in addition to the salaries that the schools will pay Teach For America corps members. Teach For America corps members are now in direct competition with displaced teachers for available jobs at district schools and charter schools. Similar situations have occurred across the country includingBostonNew Orleans, and Newark.

4. When a Teach For America supporter says:  “Teach For America doesn’t take jobs from other teachers. Teach For America just provides teachers for subject areas that have teacher shortages.”

This is how you might respond: Teach For America’s school district contracts make clear that Teach For America teachers are to be considered for all open teaching positions in a district, not just hard to staff subject areas. Teach For America’s contract with Louisiana’s Jefferson Parish Public School System explicitly states, “Teach For America Teachers will be hired by School District for vacancies across the full range of grades and subject matters and not restricted or limited to so-called ‘critical’ or ‘shortage’ subjects or grade level vacancies.”

5. When a Teach For America supporter says: “One third (33%) of Teach For America corps member alumni are still teaching.”

This is how you might respond: Teach For America’s data comes from their annual alumni survey. Unfortunately, Teach For America won’t provide that survey data to outside researchers to verify their claims. However, peer-reviewed research studies show that roughly only 20% of Teach For America corps members are still teaching anywhere after five years (the national average is approximately 50%).

6. When a Teach For America supporter says: “Two-thirds of Teach For America alumni remain in education”

This is how you might respond: Teach For America’s data comes from their annual alumni survey. Unfortunately, Teach For America won’t provide that survey data to outside researchers to verify their claims. However, it is widely accepted that many Teach For America alumni, including those who only taught for two or three years, go on to become principals at privately managed charter schools and run school districts. This begs the question, “Are novice teachers with 2-3 years experience really qualified to be running schools and districts?”

TFA cartoon7. When a Teach For America supporter says: “Teach For America is not a part of a conspiracy to privatize education.”

This is how you might respond: In districts across the country, pro-business politicians are closing down public schools and replacing them with privately managed charter schools. Many recent court decisions have concluded that charter schools are not public schools even though they receive public money. A public entity is accountable to the public. A private enterprise is accountable to its board of directors and shareholders. Therefore, as public schools are closed and replaced by privately managed charter schools, the public school system is becoming privatized.

Teach For America’s role in this privatization agenda is by providing corps members to teach at the newly opened charter schools for wages that are often well below the first-year salary of local public school teachers. Recent documents revealed that many charter school management organizations are so dependent on Teach For America to provide them cheap labor that charter managers are reluctant to open new schools without Teach For America.

For more information on Teach For America’s connections to other agents in the privatization and corporate takeover of public education, read the report Mapping the Terrain: Teach For America, Charter School Reform, and Corporate Sponsorship by Teach For America alums, Kerry Ketchmar and Beth Sondel.

8. When a Teach For America supporter says: “Teach For America corps members will now have one year of training.”

This is how you might respond: This is a step in the right direction, but no details have emerged. Furthermore, it is being launched as a pilot program and will most likely not include all corps members. Therefore, Teach For America will still send thousands of the least prepared teachers into classrooms with children who have the greatest needs.

This article is reblogged from Cloaking Inequity

For all of Cloaking Inequity’s posts on Teach For America click here.

Teach For All – Cheap, untrained labour or classroom saviours?

NZ and England have Teach First.  The USA has Teach For America (TFA).  There are Teach For All schemes worldwide.  So are the schemes any good for the trainees and, more importantly, for the students they teach?

A little background: The schemes give recruits little to no training and then put them into schools to teach.  The recruits are mentored in the job and agree to stay for 2 years.  They are usually put into low income area schools and they are there, according to TFA literature, to address inequality and improve the lot of poorer students.

There is a mountain of literature out there from Teach For All explaining why they believe the scheme to be a good thing. But since many are opposed to TFA, I want to consider instead, the arguments against the programmes.

Cheap Labour

There is an argument that the scheme is there only to feed cheap labour into schools.  The low starting wages due to the teachers being unqualified during their 2 year initial training allows schools to reduce their costs by employing teaching staff at unqualified teacher pay scales.  As a result, the scheme makes the untrained more financially attractive compared with the more expensive but trained teacher.  This can be particularly attractive to schools that are run as businesses, such as charter schools.

Staff Turnover 

Another issue that has been raised in the high turnover of trainees, with a much lower proportion staying in the profession than those who are trained via a traditional university course and school placements.  For the Teach First proponents the high turnover is not an issue, since the scheme actively promotes itself as a stepping stone for graduates into other fields rather than a way to enter a life-long job in teaching, and gaining long-term experience and a deeper knowledge of pedagogy does not seem to be a focus.  However, the high turnover and low retention of these trainees means students in the target schools (poorer districts) are more likely to have a succession of new and untrained teachers.

Job Insecurity

Former TFA recruit, Chad Sommer, highlights the issue of job security:

“A fellow TFA corps member in Chicago who worked at a charter school told me that she met with her principal each Friday to find out if she should bother coming back to work the following Monday. Another told me that his principal explicitly told him that she knew he would only be with her school for two years, so she was going to work him to death. And when he left after his TFA commitment, she would just replace him with a new TFA recruit. Churn and burn is the business model for these schools, and TFA provides a continuous supply of naively idealistic workers who have no choice but to accept their lot…

By driving down teacher salaries and weakening workplace protections, TFA has a corrosive effect on the teaching profession. But behind TFA’s role as a feeder system for charter schools is a hypocrisy that’s especially galling. Source.

Chad Sommer goes on to say:

Considering the domineering corporate influence on TFA, I would suggest that TFA has become an inverted labor union. Traditional labor unions work to promote the interests of the working people who comprise them by collectively bargaining for higher wages, better benefits and improved working conditions. Through its partnerships with charter schools and its mandate that corps members take the first job they’re offered, TFA is lowering wages, reducing benefits and worsening the working conditions of teachers. It is increasingly clear that the mission of the corporate class is to destroy teachers unions and remake the teaching profession into a temporary, low paying job. Source.

Students’ Impressions

Dangeous Minds - PfeifferNot all students are happy with untrained teachers and the high turnover, and some find it patronising that poorer and mainly non-white students are deemed to need ‘rescuing’ by predominantly white, middle and upper class graduates.

That’s not to say the recruits’ intentions are not well meant, but Rachael Smith puts it very eloquently here where she condemns those that come into “the ghetto” as would-be saviours of the poor yet are “only seen for two years because we are a stepping stone.”

Interestingly, it has been incredibly tricky to find out what the students themselves think.  Thier voices, online at least, are drowned out by the adult voices for and against the scheme, and maybe that in itself is rather worrying.

If you are a student who has had a TFA teacher, I would love to hear from you (both positive and negative experiences).

What do traditionally trained teachers think?

Kate Osgood caused quite a stir when she wrote her open letter to TFA recruits and followed up with further questions on the effectiveness (and motives) of TFA, noting that

“Teach for America is not about creating and supplying the teachers my students need.  When an organization spends more on recruitment, PR, and lobbying than it does on training recruits, you know that the kids are not the focus.”

She concludes that:

“My students need so much more than what Teach for America can provide.  The injustice of placing poorly-trained, uncertified novices in our neediest classrooms is frankly, unacceptable. “

This blogger explains why he feels TFA is the wrong route to teaching, saying he is “not here to destroy or take down TFA. I simply do not support their approach.”  He believes that in ignoring the root of the issues – namely poverty – TFA and the like are just papering over the cracks and allowing the status quo to continue.

What do the TF/TFA recruits themselves think?

Some former TFA recruits have struggled with their place in the scheme of things.  One notes:

“The educational and cultural imperialism that my fellow Corps Members and I were perpetrating was not lost on me nor on many of my peers. It was an inconvenient truth that we talked about over drinks and dinner when we returned to our neighborhoods at night. We maintained a belief, however, that despite our temporary teacher status and (in my case) my permanent Northern whiteness, the good that we did for our students outweighed the harm.” Source.

Another recruit, who left the scheme, says:

I sat through a workshop at a TFA Professional Development Saturday last November designed to help solve management issues, and I was stunned by the sense of despair that permeated the room.  In a group of perhaps twenty corps members, everyone was on the verge of giving up.  And everyone gave the same reasons:  “I stand there, and I talk, and then I yell, and then I beg, and then I threaten, and still no one has heard a word I’ve said.  It’s like I’m invisible.  I might as well not be there.Source

The first batch of Kiwi TF recruits is still going through the training, and so there is no post-experience reflection out there yet, but it will be interesting to follow developments over the coming years and see whether the scheme fares any better here, on reflection, than it has elsewhere.

I would love to hear from anyone who has been through TFA in any country, so that I can better understand the pros and cons of this scheme.

As it stands, I don’t see that it’s a valid way to improve the education system and lift it to a higher, better-trained status with very knowledgeable and dedicated staff.  Quite the opposite, in fact.

du bois untrained minds

Beware the sneaky dog

Every now and then someone will confront me with the accusation that I am against change, innovation and new ideas in education. They have the impression that anyone fighting some changes must be against them all.

Wrong.

7057083Innovation in the classroom is one of the most exciting things about education. There’s nothing better than the freedom to teach to children’s interests and teachers’ strengths, and make learning engaging and exciting as well as relevant.  Plenty of public schools are doing this.

Oddly, it didn’t seem innovation and quality learning was much of a consideration for government when they wanted to cut technology classes and had to back down.  Maybe ask them what their problem is?

Roll Over, Rover?

People also ask, why don’t I just get on with supporting charter schools now they are here anyway?

Well, to say that once something is in place, one should support it whether it is right or wrong is an odd argument to say the least.  Look to history at the many wrongs that have been overturned.

Rolling over is the easier path, I grant you that.  I have given well over a year of my life to researching, reading and learning about charters and other reform measures. It’s taken a significant amount of my time.  Ignoring it all would have been easier – and at times I have been sorely tempted.

But our education system needs people fighting its corner.  And nothing I have found makes me believe charters are anything more than a cover story for privatising the public system.

The very existence of charter schools in NZ is part of a slippery slope of creeping change that is for the worse.

And it’s the same problem with National Standards.  

The Tail Wagging the Dog

A child’s reading level or numeracy level, and how they are doing at writing, should certainly be tested and checked, yes. It should all be done regularly and in the classroom by the teacher, shared with others in the school and considered for where to guide the child next and how, so that feedback is fast and to the point, and the child is moved on in a positive way.

Testing in the classroom with timely feedback to students so they know where they are and what goals are next – that is what is needed and what happens.  Not league tables.  Isn’t the aim for students to learn?

Well, if you are a child, a parent or a teacher that’s the goal – Maybe not so much if you are a politician.

sneaky dogThe truth is, National Standards are there to be used as a political bullying stick to ‘prove’ other measures are needed.  This has been the pattern repeatedly overseas; Imply there is a big problem so that changes can be justified.

The Teachers Council is being reviewed and changed.  PaCT assessment tool with its many underlying worries, is being brought in.  Teacher training can now be done in just a few weeks over the summer holidays.

And all of this leads to creeping changes throughout the system, slowly morphing it into a different beast, until one day you look back and think “How the hell did it get to this?”

Watch Out For The Quiet Ones – They Bite The Hardest

Anyone doubting the sneaky and underhand way changes are being pushed through need only look at treasury’s own advice to Education Minister, Hekia Parata in Quiet change – a Treasury guide:

“Overseas experience in education reform suggests focusing on communicating a positively framed ‘crucial few’ at any one time … while making smaller incremental changes in a less high profile manner across a range of fronts”.

“More harder-edged changes could be pursued in parallel, incrementally and without significant profile.”

Source

Treasury asking Bill English to ask Hekia Parata to scale things back and do things less publicly does not mean she is being asked to do them better, oh no.

Rather, she is being asked to do them more sneakily.

Nice!

Ask yourself: If these and other changes are for the better, if they are honest, if they are based on sound research and best practice, then why the sneaky dog attack?

~ Dianne

No animals were hurt in the making of this post.

A strangely schizophrenic stance on NZ education

funny-pictures-i-may-be-schizophrenic-catIt’s a bit of a worry when the man who created the PISA rankings comes to visit NZ, meets with Hekia Parata, and starts waxing lyrical about how National Standards are going to do great things for our education system, but that’s just what Andreas Schleicher did.

It’s especially odd when, in the same breath, he is lauding our amazing school autonomy, our ingenuity, our innovation.

This is my article from The Daily Blog, pondering his strangely schizophrenic standpoint…

I have been left confused by a recent article by Andreas Schleicher.

In it he begins by singing the praises of  ”New Zealand’s liberal and entrepreneurial school system.”  He speaks very highly of the benefits of school autonomy, reflecting that “It would be hard to imagine [principals doing the same] in one of Southern Europe’s bureaucratic school systems” and ends with triumphant praise of the Kiwi schools that “have moved on from delivered wisdom, to user-generated wisdom, from a culture of standardization, conformity and compliance towards being innovative and ingenious”

Wow, I thought.  He gets it.

He understands that autonomy beats bureaucracy, that creativity beats standardisation, and that Kiwi schools are doing a good job.

Then I remembered, this is the same man who, in a visit to NZ recently, sang the praises of National Standards, and alarm bells started tinkling far away in the back of my mind, but I read on…

Principals’ concerns

Schleicher says there were Kiwi principals complaining to him that they have difficulties attracting, developing and retaining effective teachers, yet he doesn’t address this at all.  Surely that’s a hugely important issue if we are to improve our system further?

Just ponder what school leavers and graduates might be thinking  if they consider teaching as a career:  Why join a profession that is being battered world wide?  Why take a job that is used as a political football?  Why pay for training when some are being paid to jump into the classroom with little or no training?

Because, really,  if teachers can now go into schools after just 6 weeks’ training over the summer holidays while schools are shut or, in the case of charter schools, go into the classroom with no training at all, surely that will put a fair few off paying fees and taking years to get a teaching degree?

Are we slowly but surely giving up on the idea of trained teachers?  And if so, how does that help raise the bar?  Just how does it help principals’ concerns over attracting, developing and retaining effective teachers?  Maybe that’s why he glossed over the issue – it’s easier for him to ignore it than address it?

But I would love to know what the principals think.

There is no discussion, either, of why teachers are leaving the profession in droves.  Maybe it’s easier to gloss over serious issues like that?  But you would think, wouldn’t you, that it might be worth a few lines?

No, because all Schleicher is really interested in, is promoting National Standards….

– Read the rest of the article at: http://thedailyblog.co.nz/2013/07/28/education-do-we-want-ingenuity-and-freedom-or-standardisation-and-control/#sthash.1GLLWKv1.dpuf

If you want to know what he thinks of National Standards, click the link and read the rest (and the comments below the article, too).

I’m still baffled by his strangely incoherent views, to be honest, and would welcome any feedback on his original article and my response to it.

~ Dianne

Why were over 2000 teachers sacked?

you're firedIn Chicago this week, 2100 teachers were laid off.  Given notice.  No more work.

See ya.

4% of Chicago’s teachers sent packing just like that.

Why?  Budget cuts, they said.  They can’t afford to pay the teachers.

Really?

Swap experience out for cheap labour

At the same time as this happened, Chicago’s Board of Education voted to increase its payment to Teach For America (TFA) from $600,000 to nearly $1.6 million, and to add up to 325 new TFA recruits…

So let’s get this right.  They lay off over 2000 qualified teachers and aim to replace them with guys who had 6 weeks’ training and then are sent into the classroom full time.  These ‘teachers’ commit only to 1 or 2 years in the classroom and almost universally leave the classroom after that and go on to more highly paid work.  Indeed TFA promotes itself as a stepping stone to other, far grander careers.

Nice to know they respect the job of teaching so much.

Lifelong teachers, people committed to honing and improving their teaching skills mean nothing to reformers like this.  The kids mean nothing, either.  Teaching is simply a way for new grads to improve their CVs and for reformers to make $$$$$.

How does the impact Aotearoa New Zealand?

Kiwis beware – we have Teach First NZ, a similar programme.

England also has it.

New grads get a 6 week programme and then are sent into schools to start work.  And note they are only sent into low decile schools, not into schools where children of those promoting the programme are studying.  Funny that.

The argument that TFA, TFNZ and other incarnations worldwide are needed to fill gaps where there are not enough teachers doesn’t wash.  In NZ we have trained teachers searching for non-existent jobs.  In Chicago and elsewhere they are laying of veteran teachers to take on TFAers.

It’s not about filling a gap.  It’s about undermining teaching as a profession and crippling the unions so there is no collective voice.

A long and winding but well-planned path…

Kiwi education is similarly at the hands of those determined to undermine our schools and teachers at every turn.

It’s only a matter of time until this is happening here, too.  Indeed we are on track already.

Kiwis need to be aware that this  is the goal of reforms that start slowly and creep, creep, creep until before you know it the unions are smashed, teachers are being laid off and replaced with short-term, expendable staff, and the reformers move in with their testing and money-making and our children have ceased to be students but have become a commodity.

It sounds dramatic, even fanciful, but if you spend even an hour looking at what is happening in the USA and England, you will see, this is a well trodden and well-planned path.

We must be committed to stopping it in its tracks before it’s too late.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Further reading:

http://preaprez.wordpress.com/2013/07/19/cps-fired-my-friend-xian-barrett-and-2112-others/

http://www.suntimes.com/21411000-761/cps-calls-teachers-mom-to-tell-him-hes-getting-laid-off.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2012/oct/29/social-mobility-teach-first-programme (read the comments below, too)

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10782246

And the students are not always impressed, either…

Whoooah, now THAT’S a poem: Hallelujah the Saviors are Here

saintPoet Rachel Smith, 18, is a senior and a member of Epic Sound, the Kenwood Academy Slam Poetry Team.  This is her second year participating in Louder Than a Bomb.

Hallelujah the Saviors are Here is a condemnation of teachers who come to “the inner city” without becoming a true member of the community.

You can hear it here, performed by Rachel, herself.

And for more on ‘saviour teachers’ in the USA, read here: Why Teach For America can’t recruit in my classroom.

Or if you would like something more local, this is the Kiwi version, teachers trained in 6 weeks and then sent into schools in poorer areas: Teach First NZ

Are they better for the recruit than for the students?

Or are they a good idea?

Follow Save Our Schools NZ on WordPress.com

Category list:

StatCounter

%d bloggers like this: