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Education, New Zealand, Stress & Depression

SOSNZ Teacher Stress Survey – Part 2

In this invited post – part two of a series of three – I summarise the global issues related to teachers’ well-being and present an analysis of the preliminary findings from a short, informal exploratory questionnaire from Save our Schools NZ about levels of stress, anxiety and depression reported by New Zealand teachers.

Coping With Stress

In my previous post, I highlighted the issues of stress and anxiety and some concern about the well-being of the New Zealand teachers. One of the most important support mechanisms provided by many schools is the Employee Assistance Programme (EAP).

EAP is a service supported by the New Zealand government to provide confidential counselling services and sources of information for staff from subscribing organisations. However, it is interesting to note that 77% of participants from this short exploratory survey did not know about the EAP, and some noted how even when present and known about, it was not effective as a source of support.

Steps Taken to Reduce Stress

Most of us are aware how a certain level of ‘good’ stress is argued to be beneficial. But only when it is short-term and can be kept under control. The survey asked teachers what steps they usually took to reduce their levels of stress, anxiety and depression. Potential options included all the usual coping strategies promoted in popular self-help books, Apps, media and research.

87% of respondents said they “Try to carry on regardless”

Despite the high levels of stress and anxiety reported in these participants’ answers, the most common response (87%) was ‘Try to carry on regardless’. Other popular strategies were reported as ‘eating’, ‘exercising’ and ‘sleeping’ (42%, 40% & 44% respectively).

The responses from this short preliminary survey then are cause for concern: not only because so many teaching staff do not appear to have developed adequate coping strategies to deal with levels of stress and anxiety, but also because so many reported how they coped through ways that are likely to have an additional negative impact upon their health.

For instance, 23 of the 100 participants turned to alcohol for relief and 9 admitted to either smoking, self-medication or using drugs.

stress survey pic 3

These preliminary results mirror not only the high rates of stress and anxiety evident in UK teachers, but also the coping strategies used in the UK, such as an over-reliance on alcohol.

Sick Days Taken

When reporting how many days off taken as a result of stress, anxiety or depression over the past 12 months, the most common answer from participants was 0-3 days (81%). This may indicate the hidden nature of this problem in that staff are perhaps trying to ‘carry on regardless’ by coming into work when they could instead be focusing on their own health and well-being.

Asked how much time they had taken off work over the past 12 months as a direct result of the symptoms of stress, anxiety or depression:

  • 11% reported taking 4-7 days off 
  • 2% reported taking 8-12 days off
  • 6%reported taking 13 days or more off work

Support From Your School

When respondents were asked to rate their current school in terms of helpfulness towards supporting staff with stress, anxiety and depression, schools did not score highly, with only 14%described as ‘Very helpful’ and 5% described as ‘Very unhelpful’. This is of concern.

stress survey pic 2

Finding Help and Support

Is the long-term health of teachers in New Zealand is at risk? Perhaps it is when nearly half (47%) of these respondents reportedly had been medically diagnosed with stress, anxiety or depression and 55% had taken time off work as a result of these symptoms.

I would like to emphasise here again, the importance of just talking through our problems to a trained listener.

The questionnaire deliberately included appropriate links to helplines for those suffering from depression and needed support. A comprehensive list of information and helplines available can be found here.

Read the full article about the preliminary outcomes from the initial 100 participants to the exploratory survey here.

~ Dr Ursula Edgington

About Save Our Schools NZ

"One needs to be slow to form convictions, but once formed they must be defended against the heaviest odds." Gandhi

Discussion

3 thoughts on “SOSNZ Teacher Stress Survey – Part 2

  1. Apparently stress is no reason for sick leave apparently and is not covered under the sick leave heading, where do you go if you are suffering from stress but are unable to take time off to deal with it because you won’t be able to meet all your financial commitments if you take time off without pay. Is stress a medical condition?

    Like

    Posted by Nickola Cross | May 8, 2016, 12:16 pm

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Bullying and Harassment of Teachers in NZ Schools | Save Our Schools NZ - May 9, 2016

  2. Pingback: What is really stressing NZ teachers? | Save Our Schools NZ - July 7, 2016

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