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Education, GERM (Global Education Reform Movement), PISA (programme for International Student Assessment) Data, Protest - Have a Voice, Standardised Tests, Teachers' Own Words, Testing

PISA: Harvey Goldstein tells Andreas Schleicher he missed the point

Over 100 academics last week wrote to Andreas Schleicher at the OECD asking that PISA tests be halted.  The Guardian, along with many others, ran articles on this – and the Guardian’s article elicited a response from Schleicher, in which he says

Andreas Schleicher“There is nothing that suggests that Pisa, or other educational comparisons, have caused a “shift to short-term fixes” in education policy. On the contrary, by opening up a perspective to a wider range of policy options that arise from international comparisons, Pisa has provided many opportunities for more strategic policy design. It has also created important opportunities for policy-makers and other stakeholders to collaborate across borders. The annual International Summit of the Teaching Profession, where ministers meet with union leaders to discuss ways to raise the status of the teaching profession, is an example. Not least, while it is undoubtedly true that some reforms take time to bear fruit, a number of countries have in fact shown that rapid progress can be made in the short term, eg Poland, Germany and others making observable steady progress every three years…”

A Response

Harvey Goldstein responded to that letter and, as The Guardian didn’t print it, he has given me permission to share it here:

To: Editor, The Guardian
Sir
Andreas Schleicher (letters May 8) claims that, as a result of educational policy changes induced by PISA comparisons, ” a number of countries have in fact shown that rapid progress can be made in the short term”. What he means, of course, is that by concentrating efforts on performing well on the PISA tests these countries have managed to climb up the PISA rankings. This is, however, precisely the point made in the letter to him from a number of academics, including myself, to which he is responding. What we were objecting to was the way in which the relentless cycle of global testing impoverishes educational systems by promoting educational uniformity via concentration on performing well on globally standardised tests.

In fact, as Dr Schleicher well knows but refuses to acknowledge, PISA results in themselves are unable to tell us why particular countries do well or badly, and the results are typically interpreted by policymakers in order to justify their own existing predilections for curriculum reform. As we suggested in our letter, this is a good time for OECD to reflect on its PISA (and similar) programmes by suspending the next round of testing and instituting a global debate that involves all stakeholders.

Sincerely

Harvey Goldstein

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read more on PISA here:

https://saveourschoolsnz.wordpress.com/category/pisa-programme-for-international-student-assessment-data/

http://www.networkforpubliceducation.org/news/my-view-of-the-pisa-scores-diane-ravitchs-blog/

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2013/dec/03/pisa-methodology-education-oecd-student-performance

http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6344672

 

About Save Our Schools NZ

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