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Deciles, Education, Finland's Education System, Food in Schools, Funding Schools, Good Teaching, Government Policy, Hunger and Learning, National Party, New Zealand, Performance Pay for Teachers, Poverty & Socio-Economic Status and Education, Protest - Have a Voice, Teachers' Own Words

What I demand from the next government, by Miriam Pierard

“A strong, progressive education system that acknowledges the beauty of difference in our kids and supports its people on the front line is what I demand from the next government…”

I shared this meme on the SOSNZ Facebook page tonight, and it elicited the response below.  The author has given me kind permission to share (bold for emphasis has been added by myself, not by the author):

Pasi Sahlberg

 

“Thanks for posting, I was really moved by this tonight. I love my job so much. Every day for the last two months I’ve come home grinning, laughing or feeling really proud of my students. I am so happy to work with my colleagues and be teaching what I really care about. Sure, like any job it can be a pain and Sunday evenings lose their sparkle in the shadow of an impending Monday, but not a day goes by when I’m not laughing or smiling a lot about something in class with the kids or in the office with the staff. I love meeting other teachers, because they’re often interesting and nice people. I’m honoured to be able to proudly say I work in education, I’m a history and social studies teacher, I work here.

I believe education is the key to everything.

“And yet we lag behind countries like Finland because, for some reason I just can’t find logic in, our government has latched onto other countries as examples to follow, such as the United States (!!!)… countries whose education systems we can be quite critical about. Their policies are regressive and we are too happily taking them on, without much if any consultation with a range of the professionals (You’d think that would be a good idea right?).

“The result is that it is the most vulnerable in our society who get often left behind. This is NOT because the teachers in low decile schools are worse or their management is under par, but because the government does things like bring in National Standards and slash funding to integral and creative areas. They are not just perpetuating this system of inequality, they are worsening it.

“There isn’t enough room in here to explain all I would like to with this, but it’s possible to sum up this much quickly: kids that go to school hungry will not learn easily because they will not be able to concentrate. They are being set up for struggle and failure. They are the future, they are our future. This should not even be a political issue – Feed the Kids! 

“Our kids are leveled against all other children in standardised tests that only measure intelligence, competence, knowledge and development in one pretty narrow way. Their background, family life, artistic strengths, personality, challenges, ability to empathise etc. are not acknowledged. Kids develop at different levels at different ages in different ways. Now a lot of our kids are labeled as failures because they are below the expected or average, and they have to feel that. At age seven. What does that do to a generation? We’ve seen it in our older generations to realise that we don’t want that for our tamariki and mokopuna. Do we?

“From a number of things that Education Minister Hekia Parata has said, National looks like it would like to change the zoning system of funding school budgets (which granted isn’t perfect) to performance funding. For schools maybe at first, and then perhaps for teachers themselves.

“How insulting to pitch us against each other on a very unequal playing field, and worse, how rudely ignorant of what it is actually like to work in schools, to teach, to manage, to aid. There are far too many factors at play that make it almost impossible to make those funding decisions really fairly. 

“It wouldn’t be fair for me at a high decile school to get paid more than my mates teaching out west or down south, just because my kids are doing better in the exams. I know that I worked equally hard at a decile 4 whose students aren’t at the top of the tables like ours. I know that the kids there are just as deserving of a good education, and that they’re not necessarily less able or studious than mine. There are different parts about each, some that are harder and some that are easier, but it all levels out. My friends and colleagues at lower decile schools work hard and they have many difficult, often poverty-related external factors to deal with at the same time as the teaching. They are great and their students are great, but they would be punished with less money. Again it’s the poor who lose out. We cannot move ahead when we leave so many behind.

“The current government makes it harder for us to do our jobs really well and to live up to the potential of our profession.

“The next Minister for Education must talk to the professionals and experts, and make their decisions on that advice.

“A strong, progressive education system that acknowledges the beauty of difference in our kids and supports its people on the front line is what I demand from the next government, however it is made up.

by Miriam Pierard

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About Save Our Schools NZ

"One needs to be slow to form convictions, but once formed they must be defended against the heaviest odds." Gandhi

Discussion

2 thoughts on “What I demand from the next government, by Miriam Pierard

  1. I agree with this post on so many levels. Education can not be run like a business and unfortunately it is at this present time. With the introduction of competition and ranking models it just seems to fit a marketing ploy. I think it is madness to shout from the roof tops that our education system is slipping in the OECD countries rankings yet take on models and systems from countries that are ranking lower than us. Why not research countries that are achieving the best results and see what it is that they are doing? Just leads me to think that something else is happening here, because that just does not make sense.
    You also talked about children’s basic needs. How can a child be expected to succeed without the necessities? You can place a child into the best school with the best teachers but at the end of the day if he/she has not had enough sleep and is hungry all that will go to waste.
    So where to now? What are we (as educators) going to do about this for our kids sake?

    Like

    Posted by KTauroa | April 9, 2014, 9:29 pm
  2. You should read my book: http://www.veritasbooks.co.nz. I tried (and failed) to bring education issues to your attention almost ten years ago. Nobody wanted to know. See the TVNZ programme: http://tvnz.co.nz/sunday-news/goodbye-mr-smith-video-4782476

    Like

    Posted by Gregg Smith | May 29, 2014, 11:43 am

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