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Charter Schools, Education, GERM (Global Education Reform Movement), Privatisation of state schools, School closures, UK Schools

England’s Academies – poor standards and fraud: is this what we have to look forward to in NZ with Charter Schools?

closedBreaking news – TEN of England’s Academies (charter schools by another name) have been closed due to “serious concerns over education standards”.  Gone, just like that.

And the Telegraph reports that a number of Academy chains “have already been told that they cannot take on any more academies until concerns over standards have been addressed” (3) so it isn’t just this chain (E-ACT) that are under the microscope.

When the UK Labour party trumpeted Academies and Free Schools (charter schools) ten years ago, they promised a rise in standards, a brave new world of innovation and brilliance, and it has plainly failed to materialise.

Like New Zealand charter schools, Academies are funded by government and “have complete freedom to alter the curriculum, staff pay and to reshape the school day and academic year.” Around 3,500 English state schools are now Academies, and just like other English state schools, some are good, some okay and some just plain terrible.  That said, even the worst of the school districts never had as many schools closed as “failing schools” as Academies have managed to clock up, and that in itself is rather telling.

“Of course some academies have done well, although increasingly the evidence suggests that this is more the result of changing intakes rather than a ‘magic dust’ sprinkled by sponsors.” (2)

What does this mean for New Zealand?  We have been given the same promises, the same utopian vision, that other countries were given in order to usher in the privatisation of public schools.  Well, it’s likely we will fare the same as England, the USA and Sweden, with a broad spread of quality and really no overall improvement in education quality at all.  In fact, if PISA is your thing, the catapult down the rankings since privatisation for those countries has been quite monumental.

Which does beg the question why we are going down this path at all, if it doesn’t improve anything.

Well maybe privatisation does improve something? Improvement in education, it might be argued, never was the goal; maybe privatisation is itself the goal?

The 1 percentIt has to be admitted that in that regard, it has been a resounding success as, worldwide, fewer public schools exist and more of the education system is in private hands.

More public schools owned and run by private entities = More public funds going to the pockets of businesses and the 1%.  Goal achieved.

If you think that’s pie in the sky, check this out:

EACT’s catastrophe is a personal humiliation for Sir Bruce Liddington, former Permanent Secretary at the Department for Education and head of the Academies Division.

He was one of the chief architects of the Academies Programme before sliding seamlessly into the private sector to pocket £300,000 (NZ$600k) pa. salary plus benefits as CEO of EACT Academy chain

Add to that the number of investigations into financial irregularities and money mismanagement and a picture is revealed of fat cats misappropriating funds meant for educating students:

Kings Science Academy,  West Yorkshire was last year investigated and ““serious failings” were found in the school’s financial management with allegations that £80,000 worth of public money had not been used for its intended purpose”. (1)

Priory Federation of  Academies Trust – the Department for Education found evidence of “serious failings” in the running of the trust, which operates four schools. These included its chief executive paying for horse-riding lessons for his son out of trust funds, receiving “personal items of an inappropriate nature” (sex games and supplements) paid for on a Federation credit card, and the use of trust credit cards “to purchase items at supermarkets and meals at restaurants” in France. (1)

E-ACT was censured by the Education Funding Agency in May 2013 for lavish spending. It was reported to have £393,000 of “financial irregularities” … It paid for monthly lunches at the prestigious Reform Club, first-class travel for senior executives in defiance of a ruling they should go standard class, and spent £16,000 on an annual strategy meeting in a hotel – of which £1,000 was spent on drinks and room hire. (1)

And there we have it. For the architects of the Global Education Reform Movement (GERM), money-grubbing mission achieved.

Sources:

(1) http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/revealed-police-investigate-lost-162000-at-academy-school-9134753.html

(2) http://antiacademies.org.uk/2014/02/eact-have-10-schools-removed-the-academies-programme-is-dead/

(3) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/10659289/Academies-chain-stripped-of-10-under-performing-schools.html

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Discussion

2 thoughts on “England’s Academies – poor standards and fraud: is this what we have to look forward to in NZ with Charter Schools?

  1. Since 2010 the term academies has become confused. There are academy chains, which is the road to privatisation. Liddington wanted to have the biggest chain and was right in your face if as a county servant you were trying to find a solution for a struggling school. He wanted it…not to help but to increase the number of schools in his chain. With other colleagues we tried to work against this because we did not see any advantage for the students concerned.

    But other than academies in chains there are those schools that have converted to academies and stand on their own, rather like tomorrow’s schools in NZ. They walk away from local government support. It used to be there but in the three years that I was involved with local government support i saw two agencies lose over 60% of their staff. So schools saw it as better to stand on their own as “converter academies”. Trouble is when they face difficult times, which does happen, then who is there to support?

    Like

    Posted by hobbitlearning | February 26, 2014, 8:30 pm

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