you're reading...
Education, Protest - Have a Voice, SOSNZ, Students' Own Words, Teachers' Own Words

Education Reform Poetry Slam

quillOkay guys, here’s a fun challenge:  

Write a haiku or other style of poem to reflect your views on education reforms in NZ or globally.

Share them below in the comments or email them to me at SOSNZmail@gmail.com

If you are feeling super creative, feel free to make a video of you performing your piece, and I will upload them.

7.7.13 STOP PRESS UPDATE:  There are some great poems already entered – see them in the comments below – and don’t miss the SUPERB entry by Mr Boon.

Here are two  crackers to get you started…

Hekia, so smug
You have no understanding
Of education.

by Alison K

and What Teacher Make, by Taylor Mali (Badass ex Teacher)

Add your poems to the comments below…

Now go, create.

~ Dianne

About Save Our Schools NZ

"One needs to be slow to form convictions, but once formed they must be defended against the heaviest odds." Gandhi

Discussion

9 thoughts on “Education Reform Poetry Slam

  1. Key is not the key
    to Kiwi education
    He’s the harbinger!

    Like

    Posted by Mike | July 4, 2013, 8:23 pm
    • Great work so far, guys.
      PPTA Professional on Twitter had this gem for us:

      Hekia ‘deciles
      Don’t matter’- too to kore
      They do to our kids!!!

      Like

      Posted by Dianne - SaveOurSchoolsNZ | July 5, 2013, 4:55 pm
      • Another entry, This one from Mr Boon. It’s brilliant!

        The Teachers

        Now the Star-rated teachers had contracts with stars.
        The Plain-rated teachers had none upon thars.
        The stars weren’t so big; they were really quite small.
        You would think such a thing wouldn’t matter at all.
        But because they had stars, all the Star-rated teachers
        would brag, “We’re the best kind of teach who can teaches.”

        With their snoots in the air, they would sniff and they’d snort,
        “We’ll have nothing to do with the plain-rated sort.”
        And whenever they met some, when they were out walking,
        they’d saunter right past them without even talking.

        When the Star-rated teachers went along to PD,
        could the Plain-rated get in the game? Oh not thee!
        You could only attend if your contract had stars,
        and the Plain-rated teachers had none upon thars.

        When the Star-rated teachers had after-work drinks,
        or meetings or cuppas or pedogogical thinks,
        they never invited the Plain-rated teachers.
        Left them out cold in the dark near the bleachers.
        Kept them away; never let them come near,
        and that’s how they treated them year after year.

        Then one day, it seems, while the Plain-rated teachers
        were moping and doping alone on the bleachers,
        sitting there, wishing their contracts had stars,
        a stranger zipped up in the strangest of cars.

        “My friends, ” he announced in a voice clear and free,
        “My name is Bill Gates Murdoch Koch Michelle Rhee.
        I’ve heard of your troubles; I’ve heard you’re unhappy.
        But I can fix that; I’m the fix-it-up chappie.
        I’ve come here to help you; I have what you need.
        My prices are low, and I work with great speed,
        and my work is one hundred per cent guaranteed.”

        Then quickly, Bill Gates Murdoch Koch Michelle Rhee
        put together a very peculiar machine.
        Then she said, “You want stars like a Star-rated teach?
        My friends, you can have them… for three dollars each!
        Just hand me your money and hop right aboard.”

        They clambered inside and the big machine roared.
        It bonked. It clonked. It jerked. It berked.
        It bopped them around, but the thing really worked.
        When the Plain-rated teachers popped out, they had stars!
        They actually did, they had stars upon thars!

        Then they yelled at the ones who had stars from the start,
        “We’re exactly like you; you can’t tell us apart.
        We’re all just the same now, you over-the-top finks.
        Now we can come to your after-work drinks!”

        “Good grief!” groaned the one who had stars from the first.
        “We’re still the best teachers, and they are the worst.
        But how in the world will we know,” they all frowned,
        “if which kind is what or the other way ’round?”

        Then up stepped wee Rhee with a very sly wink, and she said,
        “Things are not quite as bad as you think.
        You don’t know who’s who, that is perfectly true.
        But come with me, friends, do you know what I’ll do?
        I’ll make you again the best teachers of creatures,
        and all it will cost you is ten dollars eaches.

        Rating stars are no longer in style,” said wee Rhee.
        “What you need is a trip through my star-off machine.
        This wondrous contraption will take off your stars,
        so you won’t work like teachers who have them on thars.”

        That handy machine, working very precisely,
        removed all the stars from their contracts quite nicely.

        Then, with snoots in the air, they paraded about.
        They opened their beaks and proceeded to shout,
        “We now know who’s who, and there isn’t a doubt,
        the best kind of teachers are teachers without.”

        Then, of course those with stars all got frightfully mad.
        To be wearing a star now was frightfully bad.
        Then, of course old Bill Gates Murdoch Koch Michelle Rhee
        invited them into her star-off machine.

        Then, of course from then on, you can probably guess,
        things became a value-added mess.

        All the rest of the day near the old school-yard bleachers,
        the Fix-it-up-Chappie kept fixing up teachers.
        Off again, on again, in again, out again,
        through the machines they raced round and about again,
        they kept paying money, they kept going through,
        changing their stars every minute or two,
        until neither the Plain- nor the Star-rated knew
        whether this one was that one or that one was this one
        or which one was what one or what one was who!

        Then, when every last cent of their money was spent,
        the Fix-It-Up-Chappie packed up and he went.
        And he laughed as he drove in his car like a leech,
        “They never will learn; no, you can’t teach a teach!”

        But wee Rhee was quite wrong, I’m quite happy to say,
        the teachers got really quite smart on that day.
        That day, they decided that teachers are teachers,
        and no kind of teach is the best near the teachers.
        That day, all the teachers forgot about stars,
        and whether or not they had one on thars.

        Like

        Posted by Dianne - SaveOurSchoolsNZ | July 6, 2013, 3:55 pm
  2. National Government education reforms
    Are now NZ’ s national standards norms
    The sector doesn’t need this accountability
    Because teachers know what they can see!

    Overall teacher judgments no longer enough
    Instead we have this computer PaC tool stuff
    What about the review of the Teachers’ Council
    But that’s not the end, there’s Charter Schools, still!

    Like

    Posted by Jo | July 4, 2013, 8:26 pm
  3. Assess the mundane
    Spend hours on data entry
    Where has the joy gone?

    Like

    Posted by Debbie | July 6, 2013, 4:23 pm
  4. Key is not the key
    to Kiwi education
    He’s the harbinger!
    Great work so far, guys.
    PPTA Professional on Twitter had this gem for us:

    Hekia ‘deciles
    Don’t matter’- too to kore
    They do to our kids!!!
    Hekia ‘deciles
    Don’t matter’- too to kore
    They do to our kids!!!

    Assess the mundane
    Spend hours on data entry
    Where has the joy gone?

    Like

    Posted by ANANNYA | July 12, 2013, 3:44 am
  5. The Teachers
    Now the Star-rated teachers had contracts with stars.
    The Plain-rated teachers had none upon thars.
    The stars weren’t so big; they were really quite small.
    You would think such a thing wouldn’t matter at all.
    But because they had stars, all the Star-rated teachers
    would brag, “We’re the best kind of teach who can teaches.”

    With their snoots in the air, they would sniff and they’d snort,
    “We’ll have nothing to do with the plain-rated sort.”
    And whenever they met some, when they were out walking,
    they’d saunter right past them without even talking.

    When the Star-rated teachers went along to PD,
    could the Plain-rated get in the game? Oh not thee!
    You could only attend if your contract had stars,
    and the Plain-rated teachers had none upon thars.

    When the Star-rated teachers had after-work drinks,
    or meetings or cuppas or pedogogical thinks,
    they never invited the Plain-rated teachers.
    Left them out cold in the dark near the bleachers.
    Kept them away; never let them come near,
    and that’s how they treated them year after year.

    Then one day, it seems, while the Plain-rated teachers
    were moping and doping alone on the bleachers,
    sitting there, wishing their contracts had stars,
    a stranger zipped up in the strangest of cars.

    “My friends, ” he announced in a voice clear and free,
    “My name is Bill Gates Murdoch Koch Michelle Rhee.
    I’ve heard of your troubles; I’ve heard you’re unhappy.
    But I can fix that; I’m the fix-it-up chappie.
    I’ve come here to help you; I have what you need.
    My prices are low, and I work with great speed,
    and my work is one hundred per cent guaranteed.”

    Then quickly, Bill Gates Murdoch Koch Michelle Rhee
    put together a very peculiar machine.
    Then she said, “You want stars like a Star-rated teach?
    My friends, you can have them… for three dollars each!
    Just hand me your money and hop right aboard.”

    They clambered inside and the big machine roared.
    It bonked. It clonked. It jerked. It berked.
    It bopped them around, but the thing really worked.
    When the Plain-rated teachers popped out, they had stars!
    They actually did, they had stars upon thars!

    Then they yelled at the ones who had stars from the start,
    “We’re exactly like you; you can’t tell us apart.
    We’re all just the same now, you over-the-top finks.
    Now we can come to your after-work drinks!”

    “Good grief!” groaned the one who had stars from the first.
    “We’re still the best teachers, and they are the worst.
    But how in the world will we know,” they all frowned,
    “if which kind is what or the other way ’round?”

    Then up stepped wee Rhee with a very sly wink, and she said,
    “Things are not quite as bad as you think.
    You don’t know who’s who, that is perfectly true.
    But come with me, friends, do you know what I’ll do?
    I’ll make you again the best teachers of creatures,
    and all it will cost you is ten dollars eaches.

    Rating stars are no longer in style,” said wee Rhee.
    “What you need is a trip through my star-off machine.
    This wondrous contraption will take off your stars,
    so you won’t work like teachers who have them on thars.”

    That handy machine, working very precisely,
    removed all the stars from their contracts quite nicely.

    Then, with snoots in the air, they paraded about.
    They opened their beaks and proceeded to shout,
    “We now know who’s who, and there isn’t a doubt,
    the best kind of teachers are teachers without.”

    Then, of course those with stars all got frightfully mad.
    To be wearing a star now was frightfully bad.
    Then, of course old Bill Gates Murdoch Koch Michelle Rhee
    invited them into her star-off machine.

    Then, of course from then on, you can probably guess,
    things became a value-added mess.

    All the rest of the day near the old school-yard bleachers,
    the Fix-it-up-Chappie kept fixing up teachers.
    Off again, on again, in again, out again,
    through the machines they raced round and about again,
    they kept paying money, they kept going through,
    changing their stars every minute or two,
    until neither the Plain- nor the Star-rated knew
    whether this one was that one or that one was this one
    or which one was what one or what one was who!

    Then, when every last cent of their money was spent,
    the Fix-It-Up-Chappie packed up and he went.
    And he laughed as he drove in his car like a leech,
    “They never will learn; no, you can’t teach a teach!”

    But wee Rhee was quite wrong, I’m quite happy to say,
    the teachers got really quite smart on that day.
    That day, they decided that teachers are teachers,
    and no kind of teach is the best near the teachers.
    That day, all the teachers forgot about stars,
    and whether or not they had one on thars
    Great work so far, guys.
    PPTA Professional on Twitter had this gem for us:

    Hekia ‘deciles
    Don’t matter’- too to kore
    They do to our kids!!
    Key is not the key
    to Kiwi education
    He’s the harbinger!
    National Government education reforms
    Are now NZ’ s national standards norms
    The sector doesn’t need this accountability
    Because teachers know what they can see!

    Overall teacher judgments no longer enough
    Instead we have this computer PaC tool stuff
    What about the review of the Teachers’ Council
    But that’s not the end, there’s Charter Schools, still!
    Assess the mundane
    Spend hours on data entry
    Where has the joy gone?

    Like

    Posted by SHIVANI | July 12, 2013, 3:48 am

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: c | Save Our Schools NZ - July 12, 2013

Share your thoughts:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow Save Our Schools NZ on WordPress.com

Category list:

StatCounter

%d bloggers like this: