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Effecting Change, Government Policy, League Tables, National Standards, Protest - Have a Voice, SOSNZ, Standardised Tests

Why Teachers are Unhappy with National Standards and Why You Should Be, Too

Educators and parents want their children to achieve to their potential, but National Standards and particularly the reporting of them does not progress that goal in any way whatsoever.

The data is unreliable.

  • It was not collected in a way that makes it comparable school-to-school.
  • Schools were permitted to choose how to report – there was no mandatory format required – so it is not comparing like-for-like.
  • Such data would never be condoned or accepted by any reputable statistician.
  • Hekia Parata herself admits there is “significant variability” in what has come in.
  • In John Key’s own words, the data is “ropey“.

The data will be used to compare schools.

  • However, the data and reporting takes no account for the levels students were at when they entered a school, therefore do not show the value added (or not) by that school.

The data will be used to judge how a school is performing.

  • Hekia Parata herself said the data will allow people to see how a school is performing – but how can this be the case if the information doesn’t show how far the students have progressed whilst there?
  • “There is no entry standard for five year olds.  After a student has completed one whole year of schooling (that is, four terms) the ‘after one year at school’ standards will be used to judge the student’s achievement…” (1) – again, how can schools be compared fairly when this is the case?

The data only shows a snapshot of two curriculum areas (numeracy and literacy), ignoring all other possible areas of learning an achievement.

  • This undermines the rest of the curriculum.

In small schools individual pupils can or could be identified by the data.

  • for example if they are the only pupil in a given category (e.g. the only male Maori in year 8).
  • This does not in any way help that student and may well hinder or embarrass them.
  • Either way, it is a breach of student privacy.

(** note, since writing this post, schools do not have to show data that would identify individual students, although my understanding is that this is creating other problems leading to Ministry recommending that principals rejig data to make it fit! ~ Dianne)

Also worth remembering:

  • Our education system is constantly ranked in the top 5 in the world.
  • None of the top five performing education systems use league tables.
  • None of this addresses the pressing problem of poverty in New Zealand, which is a key factor in student achievement.

Again:  Educators and parents want their children to achieve to their potential, but National Standards and particularly the reporting of them does not progress that goal in any way whatsoever.

~SOSNZ

READ & WATCH  MORE ON NATIONAL STANDARDS:

http://www.nationalstandards.org.nz/video

http://localbodies-bsprout.blogspot.co.nz/2012/08/teachers-petulance-and-political-agendas.html

http://www.stuff.co.nz/waikato-times/news/7444921/Fear-of-ghetto-schools

http://tvnz.co.nz/election-2011/school-s-national-standards-results-go-online-5012751

http://www.nzei.org.nz/nationalstandards.html

Footnotes:

(1)  http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/National-Standards/Key-information/Questions-and-answers

About Save Our Schools NZ

"One needs to be slow to form convictions, but once formed they must be defended against the heaviest odds." Gandhi

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